Greene County Historical Society

 

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Meriwether-Glass House (reconstructed 1856)

243 Wilson Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


According to an architectural historian, the present house shows all the earmarks of having been reassembled from an earlier building or buildings. Tradition asserts that Dr. Willis Meriwether moved the original house in 1856 from his plantation in Springfield to Eutaw, where it was reconstructed on this site. The early village of Springfield has vanished, except, perhaps, for this transplanted residence.

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White Columns (1850’s)

89 Spencer Street

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


William Perkins, a merchant on the Square in Eutaw, purchased a spacious six-acre lot from Asa White in 1841. There may have been an earlier residence, since the columned mansion facing Prairie Avenue that he built for his family is distinctively Greek Revival, and was probably built no earlier than 1850. Restored in the 1970’s as one of four surviving antebellum pillared mansions in Eutaw, this house rests atop a high brick foundation which further enhances its monumental qualities.

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Kirkwood (1860)

Kirkwood Drive

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


In 1860, the splendid home of Foster Kirksey was nearing completion but some final materials were undelivered as the Civil War intervened . Steamboats no longer left Eutaw loaded with cotton for Mobile, nor did they return with the goods and treasures that had brought elegance to plantation life. The extraordinary four story mansion –graced with eight massive ionic columns, Carrerra marble mantels. Waterford crystal chandeliers and original furnishings-would languish for over 100 years until purchased by Roy and Mary Swayze. They meticulously restored the house, rebuilt the cupola, completed the intricate ceiling moulding, placed a period railing around the second floor balcony, and reclaimed the grounds-now eight acres of gardens and a pecan grove. In 1982 the prestigious National Trust for Historic Preservation “Honor Award” was presented to the Swayzes for the restoration of Kirkwood.

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Mesopotamia Cemetery (1818)

Mesopotamia Street , Highway 14


First known as Oak Hill, this cemetery, with its beautiful monuments and elaborate inscriptions, is a most significant element of historic Eutaw. A Candlelight Memorial is held the first Saturday in December, on the grounds.

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Herndon-Liverman House (1820’s)

822 Mesopotamia Street


This house was originally constructed in Old Erie by Thomas Herndon, one of the early citizens and a member of the Erie town council. It is generally believed that it was built in the late 1820’s. In 1842, Emma Herndon, the widow of Thomas Herndon, moved the house to its present site. An outstanding feature of the house is its interior woodwork, which includes Federal-Style wainscoting and Greek Key designs in the mouldings.  This is known in Eutaw as the “ half house” because of its unusual appearance.

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Catlin Wilson- King House (1844)

241 Wilson Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Except for the warmth of the wood, this classic Greek Revival home has the look of a marble portico and columns. Built by Catlin Wilson , a merchant on the square, the house is symmetrical with two brick chimneys on each end and a typical floor plan consisting of a central hall with two rooms on each side downstairs and two rooms and the half story above. Behind the house is the original brick kitchen, a brick wood and tool house, and a two-room servants quarters, all connected by walkways . The front yard is enclosed with an unusual old fence with hand-carved turnip-shaped heads to the pickets.

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Captain Edwin Reese House-Basil Hall (1858)

244 Wilson Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Capt. Reese was a prominent carriage manufacturer in Eutaw.  He commissioned the home, now known as Basil Hall.  This home has been said to have taken over three to build and is a fine example of a Greek Revival mansion.  On the Grand Portico of the home it has a balcony over the front doorway with cutout hair pin design.  The home retains much of it’s proper elements for a home of this period.  Original portraits, the family bible, photographs and personal effects remain with the house. 

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St. Stephens Episcopal Church (1914)

Intersection of Eutaw and Main Streets


The original building, destroyed by fire in 1913, was a frame structure built in 1848. The present brick structure houses a splendid hand-carved lectern and reredos, an elegant white marble baptismal font, the finest pipe organ in Greene County, a beautiful ecclesiastical brassware, and stained glass windows. Relics of the original antebellum church include the old altar, a pew, a surplice, and stole used during the “Homecoming Celebration” of July 14, 1985, celebrating the 104th anniversary of the founding of this church.

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First Presbyterian Church (1851)

300 Main Street

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


This Presbyterian Church was established as a congregation in 1824, worshipping in a smaller church existing in Old Mesopotamia, one mile to the northeast of Eutaw. In 1847 the congregation purchased the old carriage shop of Edwin Reese at Main and Wilson, and in 1851 the new church was completed. Tall panels visually increase the size of the front doors of this large two-story church with shuttered, three sash 9-over-9 pane windows pouring light through all but the north wall. A louvered bell tower over the south façade rises into a tall spire capped by a weather vane. Furniture is Greek Revival. Original whale-oil pulpit lamps previously stored in the slave gallery have been wired for electricity and re-installed along with Eastlake chandeliers.

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Randolph-Bell House (1832)

416 Mesopotamia Street


The home of Victor M. Randolph and his wife, Augusta, was a square of approximately 34 feet containing four rooms on the first level and a tiny stairway to the second, a central chimney between the east rooms and two on the west exterior. Although lowered in a 1949 renovation that also removed the chimneys (now brick walkways), this house was Eutaw’s earliest raised Creole Cottage. Rebecca Bell, a planter’s widow, purchased the house in 1835 and spanned the front with an open gallery of seven square piers after more than doubling the size of the home. The chimneys on this new east flank were not spaced equally from the peak of the gable, a feature apparently begun with this house and now seen throughout Eutaw architecture.

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Murphy-Dunlap House (1847)

200 Pickens Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Built by Daniel R. Wright in a frame-story-over-high-brick foundation design, similar to the adjacent Littleberry-Pippen home, this house has an unusual  basement “winter kitchen” complete with an interior stairway.  A sweeping staircase is central to the open, flowing  floor plan.  Spacious galleries on the south and east add fluency to the areas where guests would congregate. To the west of the house, one small dependency remains.

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Head Gillum House (1857)

417 Prairie Avenue


This story and one-half house was built for Greene County planter Burr Woodward Head. A large central hall featuring a wide, graceful stairway separates four spacious high-ceilinged rooms on the first floor and two large bedrooms on the second floor. Early twentieth century changes include the addition of two ells to the back of the house, three oversize dormers to the second floor, and new front doors.

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Vaughn-Morrow House (1841)

310 Main Street

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Iredell  P. Vaughn, a tailor, built this home for his bride, Miss Margaret R. Steele, in 1841. It was originally at the corner of Mesopotamia Street and Wilson Avenue next to a carriage shop operated by Edwin Reese. The Patton family gave the house and land to the adjacent Presbyterian Church for a memorial garden in the 1970s and the home was transferred to the Greene County Historic Society for restoration. It was moved to the west end of the lot and turned to face the garden. Upon completion of the project in the mid 1980s, the Vaughn-Morrow was open as the new headquarters of the Society and a visitors information center. Many homes in Eutaw feature characteristics of this Raised Creole cottage style house consisting of three rooms, a connecting center hall, and porches two sides.

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Attoway R. Davis-Richardson House (ca. 1840)

305 Main Street

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Said to have been moved from an original site across the Warrior River in old Erie, the house was newly sited on Main Street and a one-story building exactly the width of the rear structure and resembling the Vaughn house being built across the street at that time, was added on the front. The twentieth century brick piers on the porch replaced a series of supports dating from that period. A physician, Thompson W. Taylor, owned the house in the mid-1800s and built the small office to the east. He sold the house to another physician, John S. Merriwether, in 1866, and the house remained in that family until this century.

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Coleman-Banks House (late 1840s)

430 Springfield  Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


This, the first of four antebellum Eutaw homes to have original colossal-order porticos, was built by George W. Shawver, owner of the Parapet Hotel. On the balcony spanning the front of the house is centered a doorway matching the main entrance below. The floorplan is a classic four-over-four rooms with a circular stairway at the back of the center halls. As in other houses of this type, a relatively narrow top-floor room, often described as a “ballroom”, stretches the width of the house. The smokehouse and kitchen/wash-house are the only remaining dependencies.

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Everhope Plantation (ca. 1852)

11334 Hwy 14

Open for Tours, Events & Lodging (www.everhope1852.com)
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Everhope is a classic Greek Revival plantation home. Built for Captain Nathan Carpenter, the house remained in his family for one hundred and twenty-two years. This antebellum home was once part of a six hundred and sixty-seven acre cotton plantation. Everhope has been exquisitely restored and its dependencies and formal gardens add a dramatic flair to the beautiful grounds. The five thousand + square foot, three story house is believed to have been constructed from timber on the land. 

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Roberts-Erickson House (1842)

158 Myrtledian Avenue


Built for Charles L. Roberts by Benjamin Gullet in 1842, this house was disassembled at 201 Prairie Street and reconstructed in the 1990‘s by Eutaw’s own master craftsman Ben Erickson at the Myrtledian address. Most original features remain intact including the nine-over-nine paned windows. Even before the relocation, this was a remarkable square and symmetrical home with a center stairwell and four rooms on each floor, all 15 ½ feet square.

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Merifield – William F. Pierce House (1840)

309 Eatman Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


This raised-cottage style house was built by William F. Pierce, a lawyer and planter who was one of the earliest settlers in Eutaw. The main living area is on the second floor above a rez-de-chaussee, or full-house ground story, with walls 12 inches thick. The house is the typical four rooms over four with a wide center hall and double entrance doors. In 1879, John T. Brodnax acquired the home and incorporated many features of Gothic Influence. Some refer to this as a Steamboat Gothic. An array of dependencies and a lattice well house remain on the property.

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Murphy-Fuller House (1896)

“ Le Caze”

409 Main Street


One of two homes built on the site of the Abram F. Alexander house that burned in the mid-1890s, the Murphy-Fuller house is a large two-storied example of the Queene Anne style, and was originally painted in autumnal colors. This asymmetrical house features a piazza with a bay over the front steps and a balcony above, an elaborate bargeboard gable, and an unusual eyebrow dormer. Ceilings are 14 feet high throughout, and huge pocket doors separate the parlor from the dining room. A tiny windowed structure-a winter flower pit- is on the lot as is a smokehouse that perhaps survives from the Alexander house.

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Malloy-Jones House (1905)

248 Wilson Avenue


A very fine example of the late Victorian style is this home built in 1905 by Dr. M. L. Malloy. This house combines the pointed arch of the Gothic, a shingled second-floor façade, bay windows, brackets, and even shows the influence Neo-Classic Revival in the short, clustered columns-unchanged in appearance since J. C. Jones purchased the home in 1917. Braced by 10 slender, detailed Corinthian columns, the elaborate fretwork framing every opening from the foyer is a most remarkable feature.

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Asa White-McGiffert- Colson (ca. 1838)

314 Mesopotamia Street

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Colonel Asa White built his home with many unusual features such as a two-tiered covered gallery across the front of the house with six doorways to the porches, distinctive millwork, and a dramatic staircase winding to the third floor. This house is considered transitional between the Federal and Greek Revival styles with complex Federal chimneys and interior trim, yet predominant Greek Revival exterior features. The house still stands behind a picket fence and looks much the same as it did when built by Colonel White.

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Greene County Courthouse (1839)

Public Square

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Soon after Robert Quarles completed his survey in 1838 and laid out the town of Eutaw as the newly established seat of Greene County, John V. Crossland of “Greensborough” began construction of a two-story brick building measuring 45 by 68 feet, with a stairwell bay 10 by 26 feet on the west. Stuccoed brick outer walls were 19 inches thick and inner walls 15 inches. After a fire destroyed indictments brought against local citizens in the aftermath of the Civil War, the courthouse was rebuilt in 1868. Surviving walls were taken down to first-story windowsill level and “as much of the materials of the old Courthouse and of the old jail as will be suitable” were recommended for reuse according to the contract made with George M. Figh. The original plans were used with the exception of a much taller second level, three-sash windows, and wider, Italianate eaves and brackets.

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Glenville Plantation (mid 1840s)

140 Barnes Lane

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Jincy P. Glenn purchased two tracts of land along the old Gainesville Road west of Eutaw in 1845. He built a home architectural historian Clay Lancaster referred to as the Mesopotamia type-two stories, four rooms, center stair hall, end chimneys, eighteen –paned windows, and six-paneled doors. By 1856, the home belonged to John Scears who added the colossal Doric portico on the front and enlarged the house with an additional four rooms at the back. Chimneys were added on the side and a new roof reached from the columned portico across the addition in the rear. A most remarkable feature is the second-floor overhang on the back of the house in the style of a seventeenth century New England house-unknown in the South but for one structure in North Carolina.

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Myrtle Hall (ca. 1840)

Boligee


Boligee (Indian name for Splashing Water) Hill, located on a high hill, overlooking lovely views in every direction was built by Dr. John David Means in 1840. The house has a basement floor and two stories, four large rooms on each floor, wide hall extending the length of the house on the first floor with wide double doors on the front and back. There is a large portico with fluted columns, a wide staircase on the front, and a wide gallery on the back. In 1869 the home was purchased by Cornelia Hayes who planted sweet myrtles and renamed the home Myrtle Hall.

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Thornhill (ca. 1833)


This house is a classic six Ionic columned Greek Revival Plantation home. It was built for James Innes Thornton, Alabama’s third Secretary of State. The plantation’s schoolhouse was built in 1845 and remains today. The family cemetery, one hundred seventy –five yards east of the house, has Thornton, his wife, four of his eleven children, and three grandchildren buried there. Thornhill originally was built on an estate of twenty-six hundred acres. Now sixteen hundred acres remains in the Thornton family and is owned by the fourth great grandson of James Innes Thornton. This beautifully preserved home sits atop a great hill providing a breathtaking view. One can see for miles in every direction.

Welcome to Eutaw!  For such a small town, Eutaw is known and loved far beyond the state of Alabama.  We’re not famous for much besides our abundance of historic homes, and we haven’t sent anyone into space, or even the oval office, but we are connected through friends, sons and daughters who have come and gone for more than 170 years. 

We take unabashed pride in our lovely old homes and delight in sharing them with visitors through this Guide to Historic Eutaw and our annual homes tour.  An irrepressible spirit drives steady restoration throughout the town.  Eutaw has 27 structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places and many more eligible for nomination.  Our community is a rich blend of architectural styles from the pioneer era to the most ornately embellished cottage.  The population of Eutaw reflects another unique blend-from the descendants of early settlers and “new-comers” who came after the Civil War, to “old house aficionados” who commute or work via computer.  We enjoy a remarkable melding of community and generations seldom seen in larger cities.  

Our history is cherished by even the newest residents who can tell you we began as a Brazilia, a community developed to serve a judiciary function.  A vote in 1838 determined that a new county seat would be established in Greene County, named for Revolutionary War hero Nathaneal Greene, and the town was named Eutaw, after Greene’s greatest victory at the battle of Eutaw Springs, South Carolina.  The pre-1820 village of Mesopotamia, one mile to the west of the new town, was absorbed along with the surrounding planters’ colony and Warrior River landings.  At the height of the South’s “Golden Era,” 1840-1860, Eutaw was known across our young nation as a cultured, elegant community.

Towards the end of the Civil War, Greene County’s river borders spared Eutaw the fiery fate of nearby Tuscaloosa as Union troops marched south-although the 1839 courthouse was reduced to near rubble after the War, some say, to destroy indictments brought by carpetbaggers.  The decades since have passed quietly in Eutaw, though not without historic significance; the city is noted for its contribution to the recognition of civil rights.

Our outstanding  city services and ease of travel via Interstates 20/59 make for very pleasant living in historic Eutaw.  Enjoy your tour and come back again soon.  You’re welcome anytime in Historic Eutaw. 

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Morrow-Burch House (ca. 1892)
315 Main St.


This house was built by John Morrow in the early 1890’s.  It is a late Victorian cottage with an attractive shingle facade above the piazza spanning the front.  The home is said to have been in the Burch family for most of this century until it was renovated as a law office by Walter Greiss. 

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Pecan Grove (late 1850’s)
6976 HWY 14
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


The octagonal piers and other remaining Greek Revival features of the exterior of this home reflect the styles of earlier homes in Eutaw, although internal chimneys and a stairway ascending from the back of a widening center hallway are unusual.  The home was built with materials salvaged from the Mesopotania Presbyterian Church, an 1820’s structure that was dismembered after most of the congregation moved to Eutaw in 1851.  The home is being painstakingly restored, from 2010, to its original grandeur.

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Four Oaks, The Rogers - McGee - Doughty House (present form 1850’s)
1149 Mesopotamia St.
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


The early part of this residence (pre-1848) consists of two rooms with fireplaces on the gabled back walls under low ceilings easily distinguished from the 1850 Greek Revival front addition.  Rogers commissioned the addition of two square rooms and a central hall aligned perpendicular to the rear rooms with the addition higher off the ground, and having ceilings 14 feet high.  The portico, with four octagonal piers, spans the windows adjoining the wide, pilastered doorway. 

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Edwin A. Tuck House (ca. 1900)
1016 Mesopotamia St.


This Victorian home in the Queen Ann style has the tall chimneys, complex roof, and long narrow windows attributed to this simple but elegant classification.  The house was purchased in 1912 by Edwin Tuck and was the boyhood home of James E. (Bay), young Edwin, and William Tuck, each of whom had an impact on this community which was profound and lasting.  This home continues to be in possession of current generations of the Tuck family.

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Rev. Gray-Yarbrough House (ca. 1826)
709 Mesopotamia St.
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Rev. John H. Gray, first regular pastor of the Presbyterian Church in the village of Mesopotamia, built his home directly across from the church - which was later dismantled and used in Pecan Grove (Murphy McQueen Home) (#1).  Similar in style and construction to Grassdale (#2), the Gray-Yarborough house varies in floor plan and has a distinctive fan light which spans the side transoms as will as the doorway.

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William - Clark Garconniere (ca. 1857)
NW corner of Mesopotamia  & North Street


This structure (pictured in the course of restoration) was originally a garconniere, or bachelor quarters’, on the property James B. Clark purchased from Robert Quarrles in 1839.  Garconnieres were traditional housing for bachelor guests on large estates or plantations.  The building was moved “to the road” after the Quarrles-Clark home was destroyed.  This home is currently (2015) under restoration by Johnny P. Williams.

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Sipsey William B. Willis House (ca. 1835)
Ashby Circle
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


An L-shaped, one-story, Greek Revival clapboard house on high brick foundations, having two porticos of the Doric order and fine architectural details both inside and out, the house was taken in two sections from a wooded area near Pleasant Ridge to its present site and has been carefully restored with the foundations re-built of hand made bricks following the original design.  The house was enlarged around a courtyard at the rear. 

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Charles H. Braune Studio Home (1860’s)
151 Kirkwood


A professor from the celebrated music schools of Germany, Charles was the brother of Gustave Braune, a jeweler in Eutaw.  Similar in style to Gustave’s home, which was an office later expanded into a studio-home, the building had just a bedroom and kitchen in the rear half before being enlarged into a family home at the new site. 

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Dew-Abrams House (ca. 1832)
607 Mesopotamia St.


This house is one of a group of four patterned after “Grassdale”.  Although there is no record of the deed, Duncan Dew is known to have come to Eutaw in 1822 and believed to have built his house a decade later.  It differs from the Coleman (#20), Steele (#16) (relocated north of Eutaw on Hwy. 11), and Gray (#7) houses in that it is L-shaped and has elaborate wood trim.  Like the Gray house, this house at one time had a two-story portico.  Later exchanged for a porch with slender colonettes.  That porch was replaced in the mid-1930’s by a pedimented portico with four octagonal piers taken from a house in Pickens County.  Later, low wings were added to each flank.

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Tuck-Jockish (1840’s)
507 Mesopotamia St.
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


William G. Jones was the first owner of this unusual home consisting of a basement/ground level with 7 1/2 ft. ceilings and a main floor above having ceilings 12 feet high.  Both levels have two rooms flanking a center hall and yet no interior stairway connected the floors.  An open gallery across the back of the house could have originally had stairs attached.  Interior chimneys, handsome fireplace mantles, and a two-tiered portico are distinctive features of this home.  

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Meriwether - Steele House (1842)
412 Mesopotamia St. 


The first Eutaw home of Dr. Willis Meriwether, this house once resembled and earlier planter’s home in the nearby cotton-market town of Gainesville.  Although the formal facade was altered by the Steeles at the turn of the century, the original Doric portico and double doorway remain, as do many interior features.  The doors open into  two principal rooms separated by sliding door intended to accommodate guests at the Meriwether’s frequent cotillions.

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Dunlap Parkins (ca. 1900)
408 Mesopotamia St.


This attractive Victorian house was built soon after the century by Mary Julia Dunlap, with later additions made to accommodate a growing family.  In 1969 the home was purchased and restored by Syrene and Frank Parkins.  The reeded woodwork with rosettes and well-adorned small mantles are especially attractive features of this period.  The woodwork in one room is untouched original pine.

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Cunningham-Scales House (1874)
255 Prairie Ave.


The pilastered corners, hip-roof, and clapboard siding would give this house a somewhat antebellum appearance accept for its portico and tall window panes.  This home, built in 1874 for Mrs. Kate Cunningham on part of the estate of her father John Daly, has a central transverse hallway flanked by two pairs of square rooms with chimneys between, and an ell containing a kitchen and dining room.

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Oliver - Braune - Beeker House (mid 1850’s)
242 Prairie Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Judge William C. Oliver built and used a one - room law office on Prairie Street.  On Dec. 29, 1859, he sold his house to Gustave Braune, a jeweler.  Several years later, Braune created additional rooms and the unusual Octagon structure on the 2nd level.  Tradition maintains that the octagon was inspired by buildings Braune had seen in his native Saxony.  The old law office is now used as a parlor and the room beneath the octagon as a dining room.  In this home now owned by direct descendants of Gustave Braune. 

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Oakmont - Webb Howell

119 Pickens St.


Charles H. Webb choose the site of the mid-19th-century home of Joseph Pickens for his new home in 1908.  He situated the structure at an angle toward the intersection of Springfield for a more impressive approach.  This home was built in the manner of the earlier classic Greek Revival colossal portico homes, reflecting the perfect symmetry of the style-prescribed floor plan, balcony with tiered-effect doors, a “widow’s walk” roof railing-and yet a mission-style stair-railing and large-paned front windows suggest the actual era of the home.

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Ward - Fleming Cottage (ca. 1896)

405 Main St.


One of the most picturesque homes in Eutaw, the William R. Ward Cottage was an early work by Brough, Eutaw’s noted Victorian era builder.  The elaborate brackets and grilles on the piazza are compared to lacework by architectural historian Clay Lancaster who further describes the home in Eutaw, the Builders and Architecture of an Antebellum Southern Town, “The main block of the house has a steep hip roof, and small pavilions, jutting from each side are crowned by gables.  A piazza embracing much of the front and east side has slender turn posts with railing between, and bracketed grilles at the top.  The plan is informal, rooms mostly opening into other rooms, corridors being incidental to circulation.  The house has been renovated in sympathy with its original character.”

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Winston-McAlpine-Hitt House (ca. 1880)

249 Wilson Ave.


This late-Victoiran house was the home of Lucy and Johnny Winston, maiden sisters who were the granddaughters of Alabama’s Governor (1853-57) Anthony Winston.  Governor Winston’s grandson, Colonel J.J. McAlpine, married Mary V. Brock in 1859, and also resided in the home. 

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Edwin Reese House (ca. 1842)

236 Wilson Ave.


Carriage maker Edwin Reese built his first home on this lot, purchased from Asa White in 1841.  It was originally similar in style to the Caleb Taylor home (Oliver-Scott House) on Prairie, and coincidentally, was also increased to two stories in the 1880’s by a later owner.  This handsome home now has a square-piered portico with early 9-paned sashes on lower windows and the newer 6-paned above.  Interior details are of the Greek Revival period.

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Mclemore-Sanders House (ca. 1896)

235 Wilson Ave.


The double front door of this house leads to a center hall with the living room on the right divided by walnut folding doors to the dining room.  A bedroom and bath are on the left of the entrance and two larger bedrooms and a dressing room are on the second floor.  Another large bedroom on this floor has been divided into a bathroom and a walk-in closet.

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Brough House (ca. 1889)

Wilson Ave at Spencer St.

Alabama Register of Landmarks & Heritage


This is one of four handsome Victorian Homes on Wilson Avenue which exemplifies the combined influences of Queen Anne, Italianate, and Shingle styles.  Brough built several homes in Eutaw at the turn of the century similar to this, as well as others of grander stature. 

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Stephen F. Hale House (ca. 1842)

223 Wilson Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


This was the home of lawyer, statesman, and Confederate War hero Stephen F. Hale, for whom Hale County was named, and who died leading a charge in the Battle of Richmond.  As the first of the popular story-and-a-half Greek Revival Cottages built in Eutaw, this house dispels the image of a cottage with open, rambling spaces.  Many homes of this type have as much or more room than the pillared mansions.  Four bedrooms were built on the first level, arranged neatly on either side of a bricked patio.  A continuous porch surrounded the patio on three sides, on to which each of the bed chambers opened.  The front of the house features a pedimented portico with four fluted columns. 

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Schoppert-Cotton House (pre-1856)

230 Prairie Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Phillip Schewart was born in 1800 at Newberry Courthouse, South Carolina, and was living in this house when listed in Snedecor’s 1856 directory as a builder in Eutaw.  The original house plan was similar to Grassdale, with Italian roof of the Duncan Dew House and chimneys reminiscent of the builders native South Carolina.  Edward Ustick obtained the house in 1899 at which time the porch was added, and other features changed. 

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Anderson-Lee House (ca. 1849)

227 Prairie Ave.


Dr. John C. Anderson purchased this lot on February 1849 and had a home built consisting of two front rooms with four windows each and two smaller back rooms.  A 1910 photograph shows this home as a one-story bungalow before it was enlarged in 1928.  Doorway side and fan lights are embellished with lovely beveled leaded glass.  A detailed semi-circular porch completes the attractive facade which still has early 18-pained windows on the first level. 

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Rogers-Nichols House (ca. 1890’s)

234 Prairie Ave.


This house was originally constructed as a law office for William C. Oliver, father of William Bacon Oliver, United States Congressman for over twenty years, and has subsequently been modified into a private residence.

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Oliver Scott House (ca. 1840)

238 Prairie Ave.


Caleb W. Taylor built an L-shaped home of three square rooms with external chimneys in 1840.  A later owner, Sheriff (and eventually judge) William C. Oliver, raised the existing house to a second-story level by building a new first story of the same plan.  A staircase and Greek Revival details were installed.  A former kitchen dependency remains in the backyard.  This stately house has been home to many other distinguished immigrants William Bacon Oliver, a United States Congressman for over 20 years; Alabama Supreme Court Justice James S. Coleman; and Greene County Probate Judge Eleanor Montgomery Coleman. 

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Shadowlawn Webb-Grubbs House (ca. 1840)

401 Main St.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


The builder, William Peter Webb, was one of the earliest residents of Eutaw.  The two-story house was modeled after the older homes in the village of Mesopotamia, including pilastered mantels, chair railings, and nine-over-nine paned windows.  The house has undergone considerable remodeling over the years and a large, two-story porch was added with a door on the second level entering a balcony.  This home remained in the Webb family for three quarters of a century, and is now owned by the Aycock Family

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Magnolia on Main (ca. 1904)

501 Main St.


William Scears built this home with soaring Ionic columns and a colossal terastyle portico as a townhouse precluding long dusty trips out to his plantation home, Glenville.  The handsome Victorian detail of the home’s interior is especially evident in the stairway ascending from the center hall.  It is said to have been designed by Mrs. Scears with the weddings of their two daughters in mind.  It was later the home of James Coleman, longtime editor of the Greene County Democrat.

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McGiffert-Banks Home (ca. 1900)

325 Boligee St.


Both the Goodly Heritage and Clay Landcaster’s book on the architecture of Eutaw mention a Baptist Church that stood on this site from 1841 to 1900 when it was demolished by a Cyclone.  If not for this information, the home’s clean lines and simple features might suggest a much older home with a later Victorian porch and balustrades.  The two-tiered portico’s tall, slinder colonnettes illustrate the height of first-floor ceilings compared to the second. 

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White Hall (the 1856 Samuel W. Cockrell House)

205 Eutaw Avenue


This house originally faced the Asa White house and was linked to that house by Whitehall Street, an avenue of oak trees, some of which are still standing.  The house was moved to its present site in 1910 to allow for the cutting of Eutaw Ave.  At that time, box dormers were added to modernize the facade, giving it a “bungalow” appearance.  The interior is a pleasant surprise; high ceilings, spacious rooms, and a beautiful staircase show the heart of the home to be of gracious, antebellum style.

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Probate Office (ca. 1856)

Public Square

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


On the northwest corner of the square is the 1856 probate office, originally a single-storied structure.  The original flooring of marble squares and the solid iron doorway and window shutters remain.  This office contains records dating from 1818 and newspapers from 1830. 

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The Bank of Eutaw Building (ca. 1882)

Across Main Street from Courthouse

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


The Bank of Eutaw opened on Feb. 15, 1882, with B.B. Barnes as cashier.  The rusticated stucco facade of imitation stone and the round arches of the windows and centered doorway give almost the same appearance as on the bank’s opening day over 130 years ago.  

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Eutaw Drug Store  (ca. 1890)

SW corner of Boligee Street and Prairie Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Early photographs of this building show a grey stucco storefront only slightly different from the present appearance.  At the turn of the century this was a variety store and since that time has been owned by the family of Cecil Durrett, Jr., and was Eutaw Drugs until 2013. 

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Lee Law Office (ca. 1880)

Boligee Street and Prairie Avenue

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


This building was erected in the late 1880’s and was originally a saloon.  After the turn of the century, it served many years as a general merchandise store owned by the M. L. Howell Family for nearly 100 years.  Ralph Liverman restored the building in 1991 for use of a law office.  The building has since been sold and is still be used as law offices.

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Dunlap-Leftwich House (ca. 1884)

231 Prairie Ave.


Mary B. Dunlap built this house on land inherited from her mother.  Bottle-shape chimneys in the regional style flank the house, which consisted of three rooms and a hall.  A piazza spanning almost the entire facade was replaced with a small hood over the front door. 

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Banks & Company Building  (ca. 1881)

SE corner of East & Boligee Streets

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Quoins, elaborate door and window hoods, and handsome panels adorn this structure built in 1881 in the Eclectic style on the land owned by Gustave Braune.  The Eutaw Mercantile Company was the predecessor of Banks & Company which has offered goods - from nails to Sunday shoes to hunting supplies - in Eutaw since 1889. 


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Sheriff’s Office (ca. 1842)

Public Square

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Referred to as the old sheriff’s office and as the grand jury room, the two-storied brick building at the NE corner of town square is identified only by a bronze plaque giving 1842 as the date of completion. 

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The Littleberry Pippen House  (Early 1840’s)

431 Springfield Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


A lower foundation, square piers, and an absence of railing distinguish the facade of this early “creole cottage” - style house from the similar Vaughn-Morrow (Greene County Historical Society Headquarters) or the larger and later Murphy-Dunlap.  Greek Revival modifications and subsequent additions have failed to diminish the character of this home. 

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Hall-Zippert House (ca. 1900)

512 Springfield Ave.


This spacious, rambling home was built around the turn of the century, possibly by the family of David Hall.  It was renovated by John and Carolyn Zippert in the 1980’s.  The homes Victorian character is enhanced by Queen Anne features such as the slinder stylized windows, tall crown chimney stack, full width piazza supported by colonnettes, and the complexity of the roof line.  Seven interior fireplaces warmed the many rooms, all of which still have the original working over door transoms.  The house has six-panel doors throughout except for large sliding doors between the foyer and dining room.  An old well pavilion remains on the property. 

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Elliott - Banks House (ca. 1848)

500 Springfield Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Gardner Elliott, a merchant in Eutaw, purchased his three acre lot from Asa White in late 1847.  The framed story-and-a-half rests over a brick basement.  Two rooms on the main level flank a center hall, and upstairs are two loft rooms.  A square-piered portico with pediment probably preceded the dormers and railing atop the portico.

As of 2015 this home is being saved by extensive interior and exterior restoration.

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Cottage on Pickens
122 Pickens St. (ca. 1920)


The approximately 2100 square foot cottage is circa 1852.  The cottage features 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms and sits on approximately 1 acre.  It has a lovely L-shaped front porch and a screened in back porch.   

It is located a few steps away from arguably the only remaining corner with four antebellum homes remaining. 



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Greene Briar /  McGraw-Reddoch (ca. 1907)

105 Pickens St.


Built by Mr. Norman Davenport for his bride in 1907 and acquired by the Reddoch family 100 years later, this picturesque Craftsman style home sits on a park-like setting of 10 acres.  Late Victorian details abound inside and out.  Rich wainscoting lines the main hall and dining room of the three bedroom house, and classic bead board shines in every room.  An incredible renovation returned the kitchen to a look of yesteryear.  A lovely vine-covered trunk house is original to the property.  Later owned by the Barnes family, Virginia Barnes was an accomplished artist and won acclaim for her portraits of many famous Alabamians, including Julia Tutwiler.  Her portrait of Alabama Governor William Brandon hangs in the State Capitol.  The Mcgraw family were the longest-running owners of the home, spanning six decades from the 1930’s to the 1990’s. 

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Rogers - Smith House (ca. 1926)

715 Boligee St.


This brick Colonial Style home sits on a large rolling lot, with a circular drive in front.  This home has been beautifully restored. 


This is a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home with a large living and dining room.   The focal point of the grand foyer is the beautiful staircase.  This home was constructed with entertaining in mind.  This is one of few homes in Eutaw with a covered side porch.

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West Moreland (ca. Late 1800’s)

22433 AL HWY 14

(Pleasant Ridge)

Debra & Ernest Collins reside in this plantation style home.  Pleasant Ridge is located about 20 minutes from downtown Eutaw headed towards Aliceville on HWY 14.  Cotton was king in Pleasant Ridge and has a presence for approximately 200 years.

The beautiful Corinthian Style columns have been a Pleasant Ridge landmark for all passer buyers.

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Eatman Bell House (ca. 1930)

620 Mesopotania St.

This grand brick structure with four massive ionic columns was built on an antebellum home site.  It is said that footings from the original antebellum structure are still visible underneath the home.  It sits across the street from the old Greene County High school. 


The interior of this home features high ceilings and extravagant mill work.  The former owners did a tour in Germany and furnished the home with elegant chandeliers, which still exist.  This home also features many built ins. 

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Finches Ferry Landing


Nestled on the banks of the Warrior River at a place known as Finches Ferry or Three Mile Lading.   This was a major landing for the importing and exporting of products necessary to sustain plantation life.  There was an old house at three mile landing known as the Kirksey House, which was used as a hotel where people waited for the arrival of their boat.  Because it was scarcely ever on schedule, waiting stretched into days or weeks at a time; but it is said that passengers did not mind the delay, for their were dancing, games, and picnics to pass time.

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St. Mary’s Catholic Church (1948)


Six Catholic women, Mrs. John Bluneschi, Miss Ruth Neilan, Mrs. Wiles Banks, Jr., Mrs Walter McAlpine, Mrs. Roland Steele and Mrs. William Lee raised the money to build the first Catholic church in Eutaw on land donated by Anna McAlpine, daughter of Mrs. Walter McAlpine[3].

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Eutaw Christian Church


The Eutaw Christian Church (pictured at right) was organized in February of 1895 and the building was erected in 1908. Information from a postcard dated ca 1969, pictured at right.

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Samuel Cockrell House (1859)
210 Wilson Ave.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES


Similar to the original Anderson-Lee home on Prairie, this house was built by Samuel W. Cockrell, a lawyer, after he sold his large estate south of Gainesfield Street.  The house retains its pristine form of the small cottage style of the early Greek Revival period.  It has a distyle portico with square peers, a pilastered doorway, and a transom spanning the sidelights.  The tall ceilings and heart pine floors are typical of the era.  A small well remains a feature on the lawn. 

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Mundy-Logan House (ca 1887)


Known locally as the old Roebuck Place, the Mundy-Logan house was built about 1887 by Frank Mundy using materials salvaged from the old covered bridge on the Clinton road.  It was renovated by Cliff Logan and is now used as his office.

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Bayer - Sloan House (ca 1816.  Made of materials from “Hill of Howth”)
One mile east of Eutaw on Greensboro Highway


The first record of a home built in Greene County was the plantation house of Col. John McKee, frontier statesman, Indian agent, and United States congressman.  “Hill of Howth” means hill of health.  It was a site chosen by Col. McKee when he was shown a high, level spot where the “springs never failed” according to the Indians accompanying him on the ride.  Col. McKee left Hill of Howth to his friend and protege William Proctor Gould, whose descendants occupied the home in Boligee until the house was dismantled and reused in the construction of this home built by Mr. and Mrs. Spencer D. Bayer.  Mrs. Bayer was a descendant of William Gould and the home remains in that family.

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Gowdey-Hamilton House (1856)
201 Wilson Ave.


Samuel W. Gowdey was a planter and merchant who built a home composed of a center hall flanked by two single rooms and a wide wing extending back on the south end.  A wing has been added to the north and some alterations made to the facade, although the original 9-over-9 paned windows, the square-piered distyle portico, and pilastered doorway with sidelights remain.